D e v i P a l a c e H e r i t a g e R e s o r t

Kumbhalgarh

KUMBHALGARH FORT

Kumbhalgarh Fort is the second most important fort of Rajasthan after Chittorgarh. Located at a distance of 64 kms from Udaipur in Rajasmand district, Kumbhalgarh Fort is easily accessible from the city of Udaipur. This unconquerable fortress is secured under the kind protection of the Aravali ranges. Kumbhalgarh Fort was built by Maharana Rana Kumbha in the 15th century. The fort derived its name from the same factor.

KUMBHALGARH WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

The park boasts of spectacular bird diversity. The most common bird found in the sanctuary are the peacocks and doves. Birds like grey jungle fowl, red spur owls, Parakeets, golden Oriole, grey Pigeons, Bulbul, and white breasted kingfisher can also be seen here. Some tour operators organizes safari tours through the sanctuary. The safari route enters the sanctuary from the Kumbhalgarh Fort and cutting across the sanctuary it reaches Ghanerao, and then borders an old abandoned road. One can spot Chinkaras, Neelgais, four horned Antelope and many birds on this road.

NATHDWARA

The pride of Rajsamand District, “Haldighati” in known across the globe for the chivalrous deeds of the great Maharana Pratap. 44 kilometers from Udaipur and 17 kilometers from Nathdwara it is nestled in the middle of the Aravali range. This narrow turmeric coloured mountainous region which played a stellar role in defending the honour of Mewar dynasty, is known as Haldighati.

HALDI GHATI

The pride of Rajsamand District, “Haldighati” in known across the globe for the chivalrous deeds of the great Maharana Pratap. 44 kilometers from Udaipur and 17 kilometers from Nathdwara it is nestled in the middle of the Aravali range. This narrow turmeric coloured mountainous region which played a stellar role in defending the honour of Mewar dynasty, is known as Haldighati.

RANAKPUR

The Chaturmukha Jain Temple of Ranakpur In the heart of the remote and enchanting valley of the Arvallis, skirting the rivulet Maghai and enveloped in the solitude of the surrounding forest, stands, in solemn grandeur, the Chaturmukha Jain Temple of Rishabhadeva. Placed on a lofty plinth, the three-storeyed marble edifice, to which the genius of the artist has imparted exquisite artistic grace, and which his deep devotion has endowed with serene spiritual dignity is, verily, a poem in stone. Majestic yet in complete harmony with Mother Nature, in whose beautiful lap it rests, this magnificent monument of devotional architecture seems bathed in celestial bliss. The very hills around, dwarfed by its imposing bearing, appear absorbed in mute meditation, as if spell-bound.